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Stress and Your Health: A Bigger Threat

Your life experiences could be an indicator as to the health of your heart. An article in Science News shares information about a study that found a link between traumatic events in a person’s life to cardiovascular health.

We know that stress can be dangerous to our health, but a common thought is that once you remove yourself from the stress then the health concern is also taken away. The study contradicts that belief.

If a person is exposed to trauma in their life, then the condition of their heart is also affected. For someone who encounters trauma on a regular basis, their body may become conditioned to the stress as a survival mechanism, but that conditioning may do more harm than good long-term.

While it is nearly impossible to remove all stress from our lives, it is important to take advantage of the things that do relieve the side effects. Exercise and yoga are great ways to cut down on stress and would be good practice for those who deal with extreme stress on a daily basis.

Soldiers, law enforcement, medical professionals, to name a few, should really take precautions when it comes to how they deal with the stress in their lives. These groups spend their lives and careers taking care of others and often encounter intense situations. These situations may end up taking years off their lives if they don’t take care of themselves and it is not enough to simply be removed from the situation.

So many times we hear of people who have just retired after years in a stressful career and then suddenly die of a heart attack. You would think that being away from the day to day grind is better on their health but this study shows that the damage may already be done.

There is still hope.

Our licensed addiction experts can help. Call us today for a confidential assessment.

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