844-875-5609

More Women Sending Sexting Messages; Reflects Deeper Marital Problems, Says Study

Who sends more sexual images of themselves or sexual conversations via their cell phones – men or women? It’s women, according to a recent study from University of Nebraska researchers, in conjunction with researchers from Washburn University. Study authors believe the numbers may demonstrate a growing trend of more people participating in an online affair without actually leaving the marriage.

Published in the journal Sexuality and Culture, more than 5,100 adults participated in the research survey that included questions about their sexting habits. Less than 50 percent of male participants said they were sending illicit photos or messages of themselves, while around 66 percent of females who participated in the study were engaging in the behavior.

As addressed in a recent Medical News Today report, Dr. Kholos Wysocki, a study author, believes the trends related to sexting may reflect deeper problems within marriages. Through behaviors like sexting, many women can anonymously pursue an outside relationship without actually seeking a divorce.

Additionally, researchers found that more women would consider taking a sexting or online relationship to a real-world, face-to-face encounter than would the men. While 83 percent of women in the survey said they would pursue turning an online relationship into a real encounter, only 67 percent of male participants expressed a willingness to arrange physical meetings with their online relationship partners.

Further discussion of the study outcomes showing women sexting more frequently than men points to the ways women receive sexual stimulation. For a woman, more frequent dialogue with a partner about sex through a cell phone or email may serve as foreplay, whereas males are more likely to seek less dialogue in favor of direct, sexually explicit images.

There is still hope.

Our licensed addiction experts can help. Call us today for a confidential assessment.

844-875-5609

Get In Touch

If you are interested in learning more about treatment at one of our programs, please contact us by filling out the form below or calling 844-875-5609.